5 Things to Do Before Becoming a Foster Parent

5 Things to Do Before Becoming a Foster Parent
There are some things that potential foster parents can do to prepare for parenting these amazing and resilient kids.

The decision to become a foster parent is life-altering, exhilarating, and terrifying. Like first-time parents bringing their newborn home from the hospital, the thoughts, feelings, and experiences you have in your first days as a foster parent are incomprehensible prior to meeting your child.

However, there are some things that potential foster parents can do to prepare for parenting these amazing and resilient kids. As a mom who has been in the trenches, I’ve found each of these actions helpful at different times in our journey.

Develop a community.

I cannot stress this enough to potential foster parents: surround yourself with loving, supportive, helpful people. They don’t have to be family. They can be your close friends, your church community, your neighbors, or a foster care support group. Choose people whom you trust, people who are supportive of your decision to care for children in need, and people you feel comfortable asking for help. These individuals and families will become your lifeline when you feel you are drowning in the system, and your backup childcare when life doesn’t go as planned. They can also be mentors, cheerleaders, and loving influences in the lives of your children… read more.

This article was published by adoption.com.

How to Use the Adoption Tax Credit

How to Use the Adoption Tax Credit
There is no doubt, adoption can be costly. Fortunately, a tax benefit is available for qualifying adoptions.

The U.S. Adoption Tax Credit can help offset the costs of adoption, expenses associated with a failed domestic adoption, or the financial obligations of caring for a qualifying special needs child.

There is no doubt, adoption can be costly. Agency fees, attorney fees, court costs, and travel expenses can add up quickly. Fortunately, a tax benefit is available for qualifying adoptions. You may even be eligible for the credit if you adopted a child out of the foster care system but did not incur out-of-pocket expenses.

Credit Available

The maximum tax credit for 2015 is $13,400 per child for households with an adjusted gross income of $201,010 or less.

Eligible Adoptions

  • Finalized foreign and domestic adoptions
  • Costs incurred from failed domestic adoptions
  • Special needs* adoptions that meet the following criteria: The child is a United States citizen, the child’s biological parents’ rights have been terminated, the child is unlikely to be adopted without assistance provided to the adoptive family.
  • Adoptions of individuals over the age of 18 who cannot physically or mentally care for themselves… read more.

This article was published by adoption.com.