Review of Everything You Ever Wanted by Jillian Lauren

Review of Everything You Ever Wanted by Jillian Lauren
This memoir is a must-read for foster, adoptive, pre-adoptive, and special needs parents.

My takeaway from Everything You Ever Wanted isn’t that with love, persistence, and a lot of help a special needs child can make giant leaps forward in his development (although there’s that too), but rather that the commitment to loving a child, no matter the outcome, is a journey that is worth every sacrifice, every tear, and every hurt a parent endures.

Jillian’s story is one that many of us in the adoption world can relate to. It is the story of a woman longing to be a mother with such intensity that every cell in her body cries out for what’s missing – a child, wherever he may be. It is a story of love, of commitment, of infertility, of a marriage tested by trials. And, more than anything, it is the story of what happens when things don’t turn out the way you planned… read more.

This article was published by adoption.com.

How to Have Meltdown Free Family Meals at Foster Parents

How to Have Meltdown Free Family Meals at Foster Parents

When children in foster care join the family mealtime can become a challenge. Children from difficult places are often accustomed to processed, bland, and low-nutrition foods, not healthy or varied meals. Mealtime behavior aside, just encouraging these children to try new foods can be a trial in itself.

However, family meals don’t have to be a battle ground. As with many things in foster care, the groundwork for meltdown free (and even enjoyable) dining must begin with the parents. Through experience, research, and consulting veteran foster parents, I’ve compiled a few tips to help all families (foster, adoptive, or otherwise) make dinners together peaceful and productive.

Ask for input.

This one is tricky. Obviously if you have five children and ask them what they want for dinner, you’re going to get five different answers. But, offering a choice of two different vegetables or taking a vote on entrees when planning meals can be helpful and make some children look forward to eating together.

Let them help.

Asking or allowing my kids to help make a meal has proven to be the best way to get them to try something new. Sure, meatloaf doesn’t look very appealing, but when I enlisted my kids in cracking the eggs and forming the loaf with their bare hands, it got them excited to try it! And, wouldn’t you know it, now meatloaf (covered in ketchup) is now one of their favorite foods… read more.

This article was published by adoption.com.